Tigers' history

Discussion in 'Hull City' started by Craigo, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    Peter Taylor 2002 - 2006

    Full name;____Peter John Taylor_____Date of birth;___3 January 1953 (age 59)
    Place of birth;___Rochford, England____Playing position; Winger

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    Senior career
    1970–1973 Southend United, Apps. 75, gls 12
    1973–1976 Crystal Palace, Apps 122, gls 33
    1976–1980 Tottenham Hotspur, Apps 123, gls 31
    1980–1983 Leyton Orient, Apps 56, gls 11
    1983 → Oldham Athletic (loan) Apps 4, gls 0
    1983–1984 Exeter City, Apps 8, gls 0
    Total Apps 388, Total goals 87
    National team
    1976 England, Apps 4, goals 2

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    Teams managed
    1986–1990 Dartford
    1993–1995 Southend United
    1995–1996 Dover Athletic
    1996–1999 England U21
    1999–2000 Gillingham
    2000–2001 Leicester City
    2000 England (caretaker)
    2001–2002 Brighton & Hove Albion
    2002–2006 Hull City
    2004–2007 England U21
    2006–2007 Crystal Palace
    2007–2008 Stevenage Borough
    2008–2009 Wycombe Wanderers
    2010–2011 Bradford City
    2011– Bahrain

    Hull City
    In November 2002 Taylor was appointed manager of Hull City who were weeks away from their move to the 25,404-seat KC Stadium. A mid-table finish was followed in 2003–04 by promotion as Division Three runners-up. They finished League One runners-up the following season, 2004–05, and thus reached the Football League Championship in the 2005–06 season – their first appearance at that level since 1990–91, and they finished 18th in the league.
    From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Taylor_(footballer_born_1953)

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    Cold, fussy, hard to like, bad-tempered … and the best manager we’ve ever had. Two promotions in his first two full seasons. He crafted a team capable of winning any game put before them, defying the howls of derision from supporters underwhelmed by individual signings (Aaron Wilbraham, Delroy Facey, Marc Joseph, Junior Lewis), outraged by isolation of heroes (Justin Whittle) and generally irritated by Taylorisms such as belting the ball to the far right flag on kick off, bringing everybody back to defend corners even when we were behind, and playing as defensively as any Hull City team could ever be upon going ahead.

    Cynics say Taylor was lucky, idiots say he was over praised because he didn’t finish top of the table with either promotion, but ultimately he revived Hull City in a way previous managers could never have done so – by being right, knowing best and ignoring the paying public who had too many years of hypercriticism and mistrust ingrained in them to notice a job being executed well.

    He got out at the right time for man and club, albeit messily, but still only the acutest of churls didn’t wish him good cheer when he got his dream job at Crystal Palace, and with Phil Parkinson’s appointment we soon missed him like hell. Phil Brown’s glories owe, as the man himself happily admitted, almost as much to Taylor as they do to Brown himself.
    From http://www.ambernectar.org/blog/2009/10/the-soul-of-hull-city-–-part-four/

    And finally from “A Century Of City” by Mike Peterson – (Written in 2004 while Taylor was still our manager)

    Taylor, Peter (2002 - )
    Experienced at both club and international level, it was considered something of a coup to attract a manager of Taylor’s calibre to manage a club in the Football League’s basement division. And so it proved.
    Having acclimatised himself to the requirements for success at that level, Taylor set about the task of providing City’s first promotion for nearly twenty years with determination. That determination paid dividends and with a game to spare season 2003 / 04 ended with the Tigers moving onwards and upwards.
    Reproducing that performance in the following season proved to be within his capabilities and the club celebrated their centenary season with another promotion – the first time in their history that back-to-back promotions had been achieved.
    In the process Taylor matched or bettered a number of other Tiger managerial records – and did so whilst also managing the England Under-21 side on a part-time basis.
    As the Tigers enter their second century of existence, the journey continues with Peter Taylor at the helm.
     
    #321
  2. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    Horatio 'Raich' Carter - Inside forward (1948-52)
    Profile:
    Raich Carter was an aristocrat of the football world. So highly regarded was this man that even his peers, often referred to him as 'The Maestro'. One of the most successful and happiest times of the Club's history can be linked to the presence of a man whose hair was silver but whose talent was 24 carat gold.
    His career almost came to an end before it had started, for he had been rejected by Leicester City after trials. His hometown club gave him his chance in 1930; they were not to regret their decision for Raich was a major factor in the success they enjoyed during that decade. He played a key role, as captain, in their League Championship season of 1936/37, their first for over 20 years. He also led them to their first ever FA Cup Final victory, in 1937, scoring one of the goals in a 3-1 defeat of Preston. By the age of 20 Raich was to play for his country and although he played in many of the war-time internationals, his 13 'Full' international appearances are a meagre return. At the end of the war his association with his beloved Sunderland came to an end, a decision that hurt him, but he took little time in showing them the error of their ways. He led his new club, Derby County, to their first ever FA Cup. This made Carter the only player to have won a Cup winner's medal either side of the War.
    By March 1948 he had moved to the Tigers, initially as player-assistant manager. His debut came too late to assist the club in their faltering promotion bid and they eventually finished in fifth place. It was in the following season when the full impact of Raich's influence was to be felt. Now in his mid 30's, he still possessed an abundance of talent and experience, which he used to influence events on the field to such an extent that the Tigers had the best season in their history, winning the Third Division North championship and setting new records along the way. His departure from the club in September 1951 left them rudderless, and it was only after he was persuaded to return as a player, that the Tigers managed to win their battle against relegation.
    At the age of nearly 40, he was still winning medals, this time in Ireland with Cork. It maintained his record of winning honours with every club he played for. It was a high standard to achieve in such a lengthy career but Carter would have accepted no less. He set himself high standards and expected the same from others.

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    Player Statistics


    SEASON_____LEAGUE_____________FA CUP_____________FL CUP_______________OTHER COMPS
    ________Apps___Sub___Goals___Apps___Sub___Goals___Apps___Sub___Goals___Apps___Sub___Goals
    1947/48___4
    1948/49___39__________14______5____________3
    1949/50___39__________16______4
    1950/51___32__________19______3____________2
    1951/52___22___________8______2
    Total_____136____0_____57_____14____ 0______5_______0_____0______0______0______0______0

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    Born: 21.12.1913 Birthplace: Sunderland
    Height: 5' 8" Weight: 11st 0lb
    Position: Inside Forward
    Debut: 03.04.48 York City (h) 1-1
    Joined From: Derby County (March 1948)
    Left For: Retired (1952)
    Died: 09.10.1994
    Honours:
    Club
    Sunderland: FL Champions 1935/36; Winners FA Cup 1937;
    Derby County: Winners FA Cup 1946;
    Hull City: Champions FL Div. 3 (N) 1948/49;
    Cork Athletic: Winners FAI Cup 1953.
    Honours:
    International
    England Schools: 2 - 0;
    England 13 - 7;
    England (WTI): 17 - 18;
    Football League: 4 - 0
    Elected: September 2000
    Clubs: Junior Football (Sunderland) , Sunderland Am, Derby County, HULL CITY
    LGE: 136 - 57; FAC: 14 - 5
    Cork Athletic http://www.hullcity-mad.co.uk/feat/edy5/raich_carter_28048/index.shtml
    Related Articles
    http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/SUNDERcarter.htm Raich’s early career (mainly Sunderland)
    http://www.englandfc.com/Profiles/php/PlayerProfileByName.php?id=206 Raich’s international statistics.

    Carter, Horatio S. (Raich) (1948 – 1951)
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    As a player Carter inspired both Sunderland and Derby County to League and Cup glory. As a player manager with Hull City he displayed the same characteristics; leading the Tigers – in many a game by personal example – to the Third Division (North) championship in 1948 / 49 and breaking records along the way. Whilst Carter was on the field the Tigers were a difficult proposition for anyone – sometimes too difficult. When he moved to the dug-out side of the white line, the inspiration seemed somewhat diluted: his players seemed to lose direction and the Tigers’ march to the ‘Promised Land’ suffered the same fate. Yet when he left the club altogether, following a dispute with the club’s Directors in September 1951, the full impact of Carter’s influence became all too apparent. The team were completely lost, and his return – as a player only – was a major contributory factor to City avoiding the relegation that seemed almost certain. That Carter never took the Tigers to the top flight of English football detracts not one iota from his achievements whilst associated with Hull City; his record puts him on the front row in City’s managerial pantheon.
    However he was capable of taking a side to the top flight – he did it with Leeds United just two seasons after his departure from Hull City; but if he’d done it with the Tigers, giving him the keys to the city would not have been enough. They would have had to have given him the city.

    Competition___Played___Won___Drawn___Lost___For___Against
    League________137_____65______36_____36____250____188
    FA Cup_________14______8_______3______3_____21_____11
    Total__________151_____73______39_____39____271____199
    From ‘A Century of City’ – By Mike Peterson

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  3. C'mon ref

    C'mon ref Well-Known Member

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    Raich Carter use to serve behind the counter at his in-laws off license down Hawthorn Ave occasionally and even though I went into the shop on occasions, not for the booze I may hasten to add, I never thought to ask for his autograph although I was collecting them at the time. Duh!
     
    #323
  4. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    Hiya C'r. The thing I don't understand about City over the years is why they haven't had the foresight to give players like Carter, Jensen, Chilton, Marwood etc posts at the club after their playing careers ended.
    I know Chilton was on the coaching staff for a while, but when you think that a man with Carter's credentials was wasted in an off-licence when he could have been passing his knowledge to others at the club. It's almost criminal.
     
    #324
  5. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    Ambrose Langley (1905 - 1913)
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    From Wikipdia
    Ambrose Langley (10 March 1870 - 29 January 1937) was the manager of Hull City Football Club from 1905 until 1913. He was born in 6 South Street, Horncastle and played over 300 games for Sheffield Wednesday.
    Langley was a full-back who began his playing career with his local side Horncastle, moving to Football Alliance side Grimsby Town in 1889, and joining Middlesbrough Ironopolis in 1891, winning Northern League title medals in both seasons with the Teesside club.
    He joined First Division Sheffield Wednesday in 1893 winning an FA Cup winners medal in 1896. They also won the Second Division title in 1900 and the Football League title in 1903 and 1904 while Langley was at the club.
    Despite suffering a rib injury that curtailed his career in the top flight, Langley was appointed as player-manager of Hull City in 1905. In his first season in charge, City finished in fifth place in the second division. In 1908-09 he led them to fourth place. In 1909-10 they finished third, and only missed out on promotion to the top flight on goal average, losing 3-0 to promotion rivals Oldham in their final game of the season, having won eleven and drawn one of their previous twelve games. Langley resigned from Hull City at the end of the 1912-13 season and later managed Huddersfield Town.
    He died in Sheffield at the age of 66 years.

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    The 1909/10 team with Langley (far left)

    From Horncastle Football Club Famous Players 1873-1900
    Ambrose Langley
    In 1905 he secured the appointment of player/ manager to Hull City, who were about to commence their initial Football League season a year after the club’s foundation . Langley himself played Second Division football in that 1905/06 season though remaining as manager until 1913 .
    In those eight years Ambrose Langley made for himself a fine managerial reputation . He built his side practically from scratch . It finished 5th in 1905/06 and only once fell below the halfway mark during his tenure. In 1909/ 10 City missed promotion to Division 1 only on goal average and, as I write in the autumn of 1977, it is a fact that in a long intervening 67 year span City have never bettered , nor even equalled , this placing. Langley also proved to be an expert judge of immature talent. Two of his discoveries , for instance, both destined to gain representative honours, were “Boy” Browell and Stanley Fazackerley, who were eventually transferred for £1,500 and £1,000 respectively--big money for pre 1914 days. Langley’s second managerial appointment -- and last full time post in football.
    http://www.htfc.eu/Horncastle-Football-Club-Famous-Players.htm

    From ‘A Century of City’ by Mike Peterson (written 2004)
    Langley, Ambrose (1905-1913)
    The Tigers’ first manager and one who, in terms of margin, took the club closest to the top flight of English football; missing out by 0.29 of a goal by the end of the 1909/10 season.
    Astute in the transfer market Langley brought many good players to Hull City at very little cost, but was unable to blend them together into a successful promotion winning side.
    He resigned at the end of the 1912/13 season and returned to his former club, Sheffield Wednesday, to take up an administrative role.

    Competition______Played_______Won______Drawn______Lost______For______Against
    League___________304_________143________60________101______517_______404
    FA Cup____________24___________8_________8__________8_______28________22
    Total_____________328_________151________68________109______545_______426

    Ambrose Langley was announced as the player manager of Hull City on 28th April 1905.
    Langley was an experienced footballer – he had served Sheffield Wednesday as a resolute full-back for more than a decade and during that time established a then league record of 85 consecutive appearances.
    Although aged 35 at the time of his joining the Tigers, it was a commonly held opinion that he still had plenty to offer on the playing front. Given that the Tigers had conceded more than 60 goals during that inaugural season, a little tightening up at the back would be needed if their dream of league football was to become a reality.
    If there was no doubting his talent as a player, what might have caused some confusion to the 21st century football supporter was the managerial aspect of Langley’s appointment; he was not a player-manager in the sense that today’s supporters would understand. In the early days of Association football it was the norm for team selection to be the remit of the Board of Directors, or at least a director’s sub-committee and in this respect Hull City adhered to the norm; in fact it would be some 20 years before any manager of Hull City would have complete control over playing matters. In modern terms Langley would have been seen as more of a player-coach, with a fair chunk of today’s club secretary’s role thrown in as well for good measure. Langley would be heavily involved in identifying talent, determining tactics and involving himself in team training matters, but his role in team selection would be more participating than patriarchal.

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    Hull City’s highest league position (before promotion in 2007 – 2008)

    http://www.hullcity-mad.co.uk/feat/edy1/190910_we_only_need_one_point_30325/index.shtml
     
    #325
  6. Mrs. BLUE_MOUNTAINS_BEAR

    Mrs. BLUE_MOUNTAINS_BEAR Well-Known Member

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    Over to my husband..... " My Grandad went to the final match against Oldham in 1910. He subsequently told me how disappointed he was as it was one of the best seasons Hull City had in his lifetime. Earlier that season City had led the Div,trounced Oldham 4-0 at home and only needed a draw to gain Div 1 status. Also half way through the season Oldham were in the bottom half but then in their last 18 games lost only once.

    Glossop also had a good 1909/10 season which brings back memories for me as a post- grad London University colleague played for them in the early sixties. At the time he worked in Glossop and I in Lancaster and we used to meet up in Manchester for Saturday night dances. Glossop was founded in 1886 as Glossop North End, entered the football league in 1898 in Div 2 and immediately won promotion and changed names to Glossop. They left the football league in 1915 and have not returned since. In 1992 they changed back to Glossop North End and still survive today."
     
    #326
  7. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    I think you mean 1910 Mr BMB and I would have thought "disappointed" was an understatement. City had occupied the second promotion position for the three matches leading up to the last match and as you say a draw would have seen them up. I think the fates really conspired against the Tigers that season and the positive progress upwards that had been gaining momentum each season was snuffed out. The Tiger's following seasons showed a decline in results / league positions and then the First World War intervened. You could say that Oldham was the cause of all of our woes.
     
    #327
  8. originallambrettaman

    originallambrettaman Mod Moderator
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    I haven't read this whole thread, so apologies it this has been posted already.

    From Hull City to Barcelona...

    http://www.irlandeses.org/0803burns1.htm

    He played 58 games for us, scoring once(against Wolves).
     
    #328
  9. tigercity

    tigercity Well-Known Member

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    He joins Geovanni who is is far as I was aware the only player to have represented both us and Barca..
     
    #329
  10. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    Nice find that OLM. I had never heard of him, but he certainly had a full life and it's good to see he isn't completely forgotten.
    Here's the only two City teams I can find him in:
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    #330

  11. C'mon ref

    C'mon ref Well-Known Member

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    Take your point Craig, not sure but maybe something to do with coach qualification and all that, Marwood went on to great things at Arsenal I believe, even after playing. Its a curious case about Chris Chilton, although I don't think Coventry got their money's worth with Chris, his back was giving problems at City, he was, and still is, revered by most of the City faithful. Can't blame him for wanting to play in a higher league and City did have another promising centre forward in the making who went on to even greater things at Manchester United and England, one Stewart Pearson.

    Chris did as good a job as he could in his brief stint on the coaching side of thing but that doesn't answer your original question and my answer is I just don't know.
     
    #331
  12. Chazz Rheinhold

    Chazz Rheinhold Well-Known Member

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    80 goals scored!! Would kill for that now.
    This is a great thread by the way Craig well done.
     
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  13. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    <ok><cheers> Thanks Chazz but it's everyone's thread.
     
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  14. Craigo

    Craigo Well-Known Member

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    I said IT'S EVERYONE'S THREAD.........VRYONE'S THREAD..............ONE'S THREAD..................EAD.
     
    #334
  15. dem_on

    dem_on Member

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    If my memory serves me right Horatio Stratton had a problem with the ladies and there was a bit of a scandal when he was Player manager and it may have left a nasty taste with the powers that be at that point in time.Chris Chilton was at all times I met him a bit of a larrikin and easy going and I don't think coaching was really his bag. Viggo probably preferred to return to Denmark after his playing days perhaps he coached over there.
     
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  16. C'mon ref

    C'mon ref Well-Known Member

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    LOL I was too young to know about such things as this with Raich, mind you nothing much had changed then about the time of Tommy Docherty's time in charge at Man Utd. Chillo, as you pointed out, was always laid back, he always signed autographs but his companion in crime, Waggy, was not so forthcoming unfortunately. Its all rather technical today, the least tackle seems to result in an injury and the type of injury they talk about today I cannot even pronounce properly, metatarsal eh? Wonder if Raich and company knew, or suffered from those with the leather footballs weighing a ton when wet.
     
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  17. rayhenderson retired

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    There was a strong rumour around the city in the mid 60s that we were about to sign Barry who was an outstanding young centre half in back line that included ultra-hard men Harry Cripps and Tom Wilson, this was in the days when the HDM was the only source news about City. When I got to the match on Saturday, I found out who was the new centre half we had reportedly signed not Barry but Tom Wilson who played on for city for a number of years
     
    #337
  18. C'mon ref

    C'mon ref Well-Known Member

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    I remember this well Ray, indeed Barry was a class act a solid centre half, was it for Millwall? But anyway, then Tom Wilson actually turned up we thought there was some mistake but as it happened Tom was quite a capable player but rather on the slim side compared to Barry Kitchener who was built like the proverbial sh**house LOL. I must admit I feel as though a part of my youth has died along with these names from the past that I remember.

    I had a love for the game then, it was my life but today I still watch and can't help but think that today's football reminds me a lot of the time Italian teams faked injury and had it down to a fine art. They were masters of the crafty foul here and there, wasting time when in the lead, and generally giving football a bad name. The sad part was most of the Italian players were skillful but cheating was their game and now we seem to be no better. Football today is almost a none contact game and the crunching tackles of yesteryear would result in an automatic red card today.

    Remember the "Charity Match" with both Kevin Keegan and Billy Bremner just about at each others throats after crunching tackles? They walked off, not hobbled off after some innocuous touch like today's players.
     
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  19. rayhenderson retired

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    C'mon ref; was it for Millwall?

    Yes it was indeed Millwall; Barry played 589 games for them a one team player Tom played 226 games for Millwall before moving to City in 1967.
    That was when football was football before it was stolen by the europeans, we had our own no-nonsense half back (a defensive midfielder in modern terms) in Chris Simpkin and he could also score the odd goal I remember the screamer he scored against Chelsea in the cup replay in 1966 and the game against Sheffield utd known at the time as the battle of bramall lane a win that took us to the top of Div 2, unfortunately I was at the cricket pavilion side of the ground miles away from the pitch.
     
    #339
  20. C'mon ref

    C'mon ref Well-Known Member

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    I agree with your sentiments exactly Ray, and yes my brain does remember the scorcher against Chelsea, I still maintain in that match Peter Osgood was the difference, he was the old fashioned center forward and again built like a sh**house. Being a youngster I was at Hull College and the tutor, knowing the significance of the game, let us go early. When I got to the ground the queues were horrendous, I didn't have a ticket. But being small, and young, I was given a path nearly to the front of the queue and ended up right at the edge of the pitch at the North Stand end.

    Take a rain check here, a lad, 15/16 and the likes of Bobby Tambling, Peter Osgood, Ron Harris, just amazing, it was an amazing season. If I'm honest I think the wheels started to come off for me when we sold Chris Chilton, I don't blame Chris in any way for wanting better things as Cliff Britton bought some good players, but not enough. We had some good players coming through, but again I don't think the management had a good enough run to find their feet. When you look at the list of managers we had, 2 players from the Leeds team for a start, and before anyone says, I know players don't always make good managers, Bobby Charlton comes to mind.

    All I am saying is that they were not really given a fair chance and so City nosedived. But I wouldn't exchange those days although they have been eclipsed by the KC crowd in getting to the highest echelons, courtesy of Phil Brown, but like Cliff Britton before him, he was shown the door, nothing changes in a way.
     
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