Pink Balls for Test Cricket

Discussion in 'International Cricket' started by smhbcfc, Jun 17, 2015.

  1. smhbcfc

    smhbcfc Well-Known Member

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    Brett Elliot, the Kookaburra managing director, has said that the pink ball is ready for Test cricket. In 2009, the MCC made a recommendation to experiment with pink balls and since then it has been used by the ECB and CA as well.
    "The Kookaburra turf pink ball has been extensively tested over the past five years by the MCC, ECB, CA, and I believe the ball is ready for an international Test match," Elliot told the Sydney Morning Herald. "We have also supplied a number of other ICC members like CSA and WICB, and have been equally happy with its performances at domestic level."
    After staging a day-night round of Sheffield Shield matches in November, Cricket Australia is looking to provide the setting for the first day-night Test against New Zealand later this year with Adelaide, Brisbane and Hobart the possible venues.
     
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  2. stopmeandslapme

    stopmeandslapme Well-Known Member

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    Shove your ****ing gay ball up your arse.
     
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  3. smhbcfc

    smhbcfc Well-Known Member

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    <laugh><laugh><laugh>
     
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  4. smhbcfc

    smhbcfc Well-Known Member

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    Australia and New Zealand will meet in cricket's first day-night Test match later this year.
    Starting on November 27, the final Test of their three-match series will be under lights in Adelaide, with a pink ball and both teams wearing whites.
    Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland said he hoped the idea would increase interest in the game.
    The New Zealand Cricket Players' Association said its members were "nervous" about the experiment.
    NZCPA chief executive Heath Mills indicated concerns about the difficulties of playing Test cricket under varying light and of dealing with the pink ball
     
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  5. smhbcfc

    smhbcfc Well-Known Member

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    The Australian cricketer with the most relevant experience of the pink ball to be used in next summer's day-night Test experiment against New Zealand admits he could not see the ball when fielding and has other serious reservations about the concept. Mitchell Starc played for New South Wales in a day-night Sheffield Shield fixture against South Australia at Adelaide Oval last summer, the same ground where the Test will be played. He is "yet to be convinced".
    Even though it was the latest in countless versions of the pink balls trialled by Cricket Australia's official supplier Kookaburra, Starc said it was nothing like using the traditional red ball.
    "It's definitely not a red ball," Starc said. "It doesn't react anything like the red ball, in terms of swing and the hardness of it anyway. It goes soft pretty quickly, I didn't see a huge amount of reverse swing in that game and I don't think it swung from memory too much until the artificial light took over. It definitely reacts very, very differently to the red ball.
    "The other thing as well is, personally, I couldn't see the thing at night on the boundary. I couldn't see the ball. So I'm not sure how the crowd are going to see it. I understand the pink ball has changed a lot from when it first came in for trials. It's improved a lot, so Kookaburra has done well there.
    "But time will tell if it works with the crowds and the viewership and the way that cricketers respond to it. We can understand why it's happening - they want to grow the game and attract more people to the game at the different times it's going to be played."
     
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  6. stopmeandslapme

    stopmeandslapme Well-Known Member

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    Day/night too. Why not also change it to one innings each of 50 or better still 20 overs?
     
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  7. littleDinosaurLuke

    littleDinosaurLuke Well-Known Member

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    And why do they want to use a pink ball? Why not black? Or yellow? Or any colour from a snooker table?
     
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  8. smhbcfc

    smhbcfc Well-Known Member

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    An overwhelming majority of players who participated in the inaugural day-night Test between Australia and New Zealand in Adelaide believe the concept of floodlit Test cricket needs considerable work before being broadened beyond the highly tailored environment concocted by Cricket Australia last week.
    In the aftermath of the match, the Federation of International Cricketers Associations (FICA) surveyed the participants, and the responses from 20 of the 22 players showed strong support for the general concept, but significant concerns about the various issues raised in Adelaide - particularly that the pink ball needs further refinement.
     
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  9. smhbcfc

    smhbcfc Well-Known Member

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    please log in to view this image
     
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  10. Mrs H

    Mrs H Active Member

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    The first game went by without any disasters.
    It was low scoring but in many ways that made it more interesting.
    The experiment needs to be tried at other venues in other countries.
    I would like to see some County Championship games tried in this country
     
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  11. Mrs H

    Mrs H Active Member

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    According to Cricket Australia one of the Ashes Tests may be played under lights
     
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