Eugene Dadi Fan Club

Discussion in 'Aberdeen' started by User Deleted, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. User Deleted

    User Deleted Well-Known Member

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    Post your favourite pictures of Eugene Dadi

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  2. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    My favourite mental picture of Eugene Dadi – and I’m hoping this is allowed and doesn’t break any rules? – involves coming home after being upset by the world and finding Eugene waiting for me with a nice cup of tea and a warm, comforting smile. “It’s alright,” he’ll say, “everything’s going to be fine. The world is full of careless, greedy people, the kind who drop litter and cut across you at roundabouts and often wish harm upon others. Rest your weary soul, dear Psycho, and allow for the possibility of karma, redemption and God.”

    Gets me every time.
     
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  3. User Deleted

    User Deleted Well-Known Member

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    No thats fine! A 'warm comforting smile' like in the second photo? Because I'd say the first photo is more jubilant than comforting. Yeah, definately the second photo I'd say.

    And what is Eugene wearing in this mental picture?
     
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  4. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Ian.

    It’s great to be able to share these things in a safe and friendly environment. I’m hopeful that others will feel sufficiently emboldened to come forward with their own favourite mental pictures of Eugene Dadi. Something to remember him by, in any event.

    Have you seen Gregory Peck in the film To Kill a Mockingbird? When he’s not in court fighting pernicious racism, he’s to be found wearing an avuncular cardigan. I see Eugene wearing this very same cardigan and I also see him as being of the same moral stock as Atticus Finch – the name of Peck’s character in the film.

    The children, Scout and Jem, are enveloped and made safe by his (Peck’s) upstanding decency and human warmth and they learn to view their father as a hero. I feel that Eugene Dadi offers a similar sort of comfort to all God’s children – not just Scout and Jem, Ian - and we may feel blessed when he heeds the pain of our prayers.

    I generally have him in Speedos in the downstairs department, if I’m honest, and the elegant abundance of his pulsing manhood is delicately traced by the soaking wet materials. Tiny wee droplets of moisture sometimes fall to my blanket as he tucks me up in bed. Oh Dadi, I love you so much and I need you.

    Thank you so much for letting me share this, Ian. I just hope it helps others in some way.
     
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  5. User Deleted

    User Deleted Well-Known Member

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    One of my favourite films psycho <ok> And I'm happy with the outfit you have him in. I thought for a moment there you might be picturing him completely naked. Which would be highly disrespectful given the anti nudist stance he adopted whilst he was at Wellington Phoenix and the media backlash he had to endure.


    I felt my pelvic floor tighten a little when you mentioned the speedo's. But I can't think about Eugene like that. I mustn't think about him like that.

    According to wikipedia, he has his own fashion brand. Thats quite something when you consider most of his time is taken up by rescuing and healing sick lambs, foals and calves.

    So come on folks, share your favourite photos of Eugene, and indeed your mental pictures.

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  6. monacoger

    monacoger Well-Known Member

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    Excellent film and book.
     
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  7. monacoger

    monacoger Well-Known Member

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    Really that should have read, "book and film".
     
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  8. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    One of your favourite films? Nice one. Same here. I absolutely love it. When Atticus Finch leaves the courtroom and everyone (on the top balcony) stands.....oh dear. I try not to be a girl about these things, of course, but that rips into me. And his closing statement is magic, especially when the quiet, studied delivery is broken by his near shouting of the word "temerity".

    Excerpt from the closing statement of Gregory Peck (before he became an actor, obviously, and still prosecuted cases in the deep south):

    "The witnesses for the State, with the exception of the sheriff of Lincoln County, have presented themselves to you gentlemen - to this Court - in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted; confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption, the evil assumption, that all negroes lie; all negroes are basically immoral beings; all negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption that one associates with minds of their calibre, and which is in itself, gentlemen, a lie - which I do not need to point out to you.

    And so, a quiet, humble, respectable negro, who has had the unmitigated temerity to feel sorry for a white woman, has had to put his word against two white peoples. The defendant is not guilty. But somebody in this courtroom is.....

    .....In the name of God, do your duty. In the name of God, believe Tom Robinson."


    I digress.


    There is a beautifully evocative painting of Eugene Dadi entitled Dadi's Narrow Escape From The Via Dolorosa. Here we are:

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    It's so incredibly lifelike, so vibrantly painful in its depiction of His suffering that I'm rarely able to look at it for long. I'm just grateful that there was an artist to hand some 600 years after the event to capture what this may well have looked like.

    Listen, you seem like a noble, wise and compassionate man, Ian, and I've no desire to see our church split, okay, but please don't allow the fact that you won't personally envision Dadi entirely naked to cloud your judgement when it comes to assessing the worshipful practice of others.

    Respect my culture, respect my people - and I will surely respect you and yours.

    Right now, this is exactly like the Sunni and Shia split that arose shortly after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Violence and war split the small community of Muslims into two branches that would never reunite, Ian, and I need hardly remind you that the war continued with Ali and then with his son, Hussein - who was decapitated and had his head carried in tribute to the Sunni caliph in Damascus. His body was left on the battlefield at Karbala.

    Exactly like that.

    So let's all just calm down here and see if we can't find some room for differing outlooks.
     
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  9. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    True. But which is better?

    For once, I find that the film of the book is better than the book it was based on. (I only read the book in school, however, so it was read under a kind of duress.)

    An example of where a film entirely destroys the memory of a book: Captain Corelli's Mandolin.

    Shocking. Absolutely shocking.
     
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  10. Tina_old

    Tina_old Princess

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    I read the book when I was on holiday one year and I loved it. Got the dvd when it came out and I ended up turning it off about half an hour into it.

    <ok>
     
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  11. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    Oh my God. Nicolas Cage? What were they thinking? Who on earth thought that this would be a good idea? There was some serious mis-casting going on in that film, Tina, and the charm of the book – a multi-layered work of intricate magic – was entirely lost.

    You did well to survive half an hour. I watched the whole thing with my wife - who made me watch it, just to be clear; I’ll almost never watch a film unless I’m absolutely forced to - and felt utterly appalled that such an excellent book might be ruined this way.

    I always saw someone like......ach, I forget his name: Scottish guy, played the part of a pleasingly immoral lothario in Shirley Valentine (“you want for to come on my boat to make ****eeng?”), crumpled looking, roundabout middle-aged, soulful and deep, in the Nicolas Cage role. Someone with a bit of lived-in depth, in any event, not some bug-eyed beanpole with an inerasable smirk on his face. God help me. The whole thing was so horribly sentimentalised, so American and light. Useless.

    And the last film I ever watched – The Men Who Stare At Goats – was a soul-destroying catastrophe. A rather thought-provoking and tragically funny book (not fiction this time, however) was sabotaged by the film-makers who went for the cheapest laughs and the most stupidly contrived ending imaginable. Horrifying. Just hopeless. (Quite a promising start to the film, as well, which made it all the more disappointing.) It left me feeling empty and depressed and pissed off at the galling stupidity that must surely surface when one seeks to feed and placate the lowest common denominator.

    But I’m over it now, Tina, so don’t worry. Totally calm. Definitely.

    We can agree that Captain Corelli's Mandolin was a brilliantly enjoyable book, however, and feel happy about this unchanging fact. And perfect holiday reading material, no two ways about it.
     
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  12. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    Actually, come to think of it, there's another Scottish actor who would also have been quite good in the role - the guy who played Rebus. The older man who played Rebus, not the younger one.

    I'm not good with names. Sorry.
     
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  13. Tina_old

    Tina_old Princess

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    That'll be Bishop Conti's brother Tom you're talking about <laugh><laugh>

    I'm reading a Rebus novel just now! My first one, and it's really really good! No idea who plays the part though as I haven't seen the programme.
     
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  14. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    Aha. Well done. Tom Conti. (I like him.) I'd watch him over Nicolas Cage any day. And I've just internetted an email search on the Googleskype highway - I'm pretty much up to speed with all the latest terms the kids use, Tina, try not to be intimidated - to find out who played Rebus: Ken Stott. (The other person who played him was someone called John Hannah. Looks like a startled fish, if I have him down right.) Anyway, Ken Stott or Tom Conti would have been far better than Nicolas Cage. Factzilla.

    Good news that you're reading a Rebus. I think I've read nearly all of them (and I almost never read fiction) and loved every moment. I bet you anything that you'll end up reading another and another. (I love being able to picture exactly where he is when he's describing his way through Edinburgh. I don’t know where you grew up, obviously, so I’m not sure if this will be quite the same for you?)

    Have you just picked a random Rebus or did you start at the beginning? (I’m not sure it makes a great deal of difference, fair enough, although earlier cases are certainly occasionally referenced in later books.) Useful tip of the day: charity shops often have these (Rebus) books in abundance – even here in Ireland. Why spend £7.99 or whatever when you can get them for 50p? (And the security in charity shops is usually non-existent, to be fair, so why even spend 50p? Help yourself to a treat, Tina, and be sure to wear a big coat.)

    Guilty secret: I once read and enjoyed all the John Grisham books. If you haven’t already, you should maybe give them a whirl. These can also almost always be found in charity shops. They are heavily formulaic, a bit preachy (maverick lawyer, usually called something like Randy = good; Corporations and big tobacco (boo) = bad) and a bit Americany, right enough, but once you start there's no going back, really. I felt dirty and morally isolated for enjoying them so much.

    Get down to your nearest Cancer Research UK shop and help yourself to a bundle.
     
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  15. Tina_old

    Tina_old Princess

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    I laughed while reading your post. This Rebus one was a random, bought straight from Barnardos <laugh> I only bought it because I was waiting for the newest Grisham book coming from Amazon. It's my car book.

    I've read every Grisham novel - even the 'Skipping Christmas' one <laugh> I also had the misfortune of going out of my way to watch the movie of it too lol I'm a big Grisham fan, probably because it's a very easy read and theres no smut in his books! Half way through The Litigators just now (bedtime book)

    Simon Beckett books (the latest 4 or 5, all about David Beckett who's a forensic anthropologist - but saying that, the last one was pretty crappy imo.) Probably my favourite just now is Alex Berenson. He's an ex journalist (American) and his books are about the adventures of John Wells who is an undercover agent, often averting disasters like nuclear bomb detonations and assasinations. An Islam convert too, so it's a bit educational for me too <laugh>I've read all his stuff and can't wait til his next one's out. Captivating.

    I do like the Rebus ones though, so I'll have a look and maybe start from the beginning. Right after I read the Paul O'Grady book I missed. His books are actually worth a read, if you're open minded and can at least tolerate him. Very witty and a very colourful character!

    p.s. Born and bred in Glasgow. I should be used with thieving just because of that, but it's something i've never actually done.

    Never too old to learn though, eh? :bandit:
     
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  16. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    It’s as well that nobody reads what’s said on the Aberdeen boards, Tina, or they could use our excitingly filthy Grisham failings against us. There are a lot of bad people out there, we should be more cautious. (And that’s before we get onto the fact that we make ourselves seem like spend-averse bag-people who rummage through charity shops for a bargain.)

    Anyway, I’ve not read Skipping Christmas (you are clearly far gone in your Grishamy fixation) – only because I’ve yet to see it in a cancer or poor wee kittens charity shop - but did once read A Painted House and was made instantly despondent to find that The Grish was suddenly trying to be a proper, credible writer. It’s like Dan Brown trying to write War and Peace. It’s just not happening. I want my underdog lawyer and I want him to have a name like Rudy Kanchelski and I want corporations slain and I want money being wired round the planet in a series of complex financial shenanigans and I want the good guy legal whizz to overcome all obstacles and triumph against the odds – even (and especially) if he’s been working from a rickety shed in a dangerous downtown black neighbourhood. FFS. How’s this too much to ask for? I’ll get my fix of ****y elsewhere, John, so stick with what you know.

    But a John Grisham book has been made into a film, you say? That’s a tempter. And come to think of it, quite a few of his books – okay, all of the ones I’ve read - would be easily translatable into films. How come nobody has done this? (Or maybe they have and I’ve just missed it? Like I say, I don’t tend to watch films and am pretty out of touch with, you know, everything. I live up a hill in the middle of nowhere and tend to avoid people wherever possible, sometimes for months on end. My only excuse.)

    Simon Beckett, Alex Berenson and Paul O’Grady are outwith with my spheres of reference, I’m afraid, and so I’m immediately out of my depth. I’ll need to check my wife’s books to see if she’s got any of their stuff (she’s big on fiction, whereas I’m a fan of non-fiction). If you have a specific book of Paul O’Grady’s to recommend, I’d happily enough give it a whirl. It had better be good. <grr>

    Whereabouts in Glasgow? You can keep it vague, if you like - north, south, east, west etc. I’ve lived in two places in Glasgow: Ibrox/Govan (nuclear winter) and Queen’s Park (pretty good place). Victoria Road was magic for charity shops and Allison Street was grand for buying four tons of coriander for, roughly, 30p. If you've not been, go. It's the business.
     
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  17. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    PS. A Glaswegian who’s never pinched anything? Hmm. Because it’s you, Tina, and because nobody likes to be accused of social stereotyping, I’m going to take your word for this, okay? But we’ve got CCTV in here, you know? Every move you make on the Aberdeen forum is being monitored closely and my staff have been busily nailing down the Aberdeen trinkets we have for sale since learning the shock news of your heritage and culture of sticky-fingered thieving. N’affence, ma unco guid quiney.

    But yes, you’re quite right: it’s never too late to learn. Get your big coat on and get stuck in there. Besides, with Children In Need being such a stunning success (they make tons of money for the kids, tons), stealing from Barnardo’s becomes morally viable. If you do find yourself assailed by any moral doubts, however, just read the book and then take it to some other charidee shop and hand it over to the day-release guy gently dribbling behind the till. Say something like “just doing my bit” when you hand it over - and remember to look compassionate as you do so. Stick with me and I’ll see you right, okay?
     
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  18. Tina_old

    Tina_old Princess

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    I'm not sure if you're at the wind up, but I don't thing you are re the Grisham books being made into movies. Tons of them have been made into movies. I'd need to Google them for the list but most of his older books like The Firm (Tom Cruise stars) and tons of others were indeed made into movies. I'm laughing at you mentioning the Painted House. I didn't real all of that one. I tried, but I just didn't like it. I do that with books. I had one about North Korea too that I just couldn't get into either but I've left the bookmark in it just incase <laugh>

    I thought I had read all O'Grady's books, like I mentioned, but I've just found this one, At My Mother's Knee (or something like that). I've read the first few chapters and I think this may well be his first book. It definitely looks a good read..but don't take my word for it <whistle>

    Berenson's books are definitely worth going out of your way to get imo, if your wife doesn't have them. (nice Christmas present for her, but really for you <laugh>)

    I'm in the west end, but I have family all over Glasgow, in fact, all over Europe <laugh>

    I'm deeply offended at you nailing down the Aberdeen artefacts because I now frequent here <laugh>
     
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  19. Psychosomatic

    Psychosomatic Well-Known Member

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    Nah, no wind up, Tina. I really am that out of touch and I really do live in (a happy enough) isolation - my wife and dogs are enough for me.

    But looky here, I was about to respond to everything else you'd written but it looks like you've been banned:

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    It's the word "banned" beneath your name that first aroused my suspicions. I'm sharp that way. Did you maybe fall prey to Not606's Night Of The Long Knives?

    I'll hold off from responding in full, anyway, just in case I'm talking to myself (although there wouldn't be anything particularly unusual in that, right enough). I hope your ban isn't permanent, though, and I'll hope to see you back here soon.

    Take it easy....
     
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  20. User Deleted

    User Deleted Well-Known Member

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    haha what happened to psychospmatic ****in legend
     
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